IRS extends Economic Impact Payment deadline to Nov. 21 to help non-filers

IRS extends Economic Impact Payment deadline to Nov. 21 to help non-filers

The Internal Revenue Service announced today that the deadline to register for an Economic Impact Payment (EIP) is now November 21, 2020. This new date will provide an additional five weeks beyond the original deadline.

The IRS urges people who don’t typically file a tax return – and haven’t received an Economic Impact Payment – to register as quickly as possible using the Non-Filers: Enter Info Here tool on IRS.gov. The tool will not be available after November 21.

“We took this step to provide more time for those who have not yet received a payment to register to get their money, including those in low-income and underserved communities,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “The IRS is deeply involved in processing and programming that overlaps filing seasons. Any further extension beyond November would adversely impact our work on the 2020 and 2021 filing seasons. The Non-Filers portal has been available since the spring and has been used successfully by many millions of Americans.”

Special note: This additional time into November is solely for those who have not received their EIP and don’t normally file a tax return. For taxpayers who requested an extension of time to file their 2019 tax return, that deadline date remains October 15.

To support the ongoing EIP effort, many partner groups have been working with the IRS, helping translate and making available in 35 languages IRS information and resources on Economic Impact Payments.

To help spread the word, the IRS sent nearly 9 million letters in September to people who may be eligible for the $1,200 Economic Impact Payments but don’t normally file a tax return. This push encourages people to use the Non-Filers tool on IRS.gov.

“Time is running out for those who don’t normally file a tax return to get their payments,” Rettig added. “Registration is quick and easy, and we urge everyone to share this information to reach as many people before the deadline.”

While most eligible U.S. taxpayers have automatically received their Economic Impact Payment, others who don’t have a filing obligation need to use the Non-Filers tool to register with the IRS to get their money. Typically, this includes people who receive little or no income.

The Non-Filers tool is secure and is based on Free File Fillable Forms, part of the Free File Alliance’s offering of free products on IRS.gov.

The Non-Filers tool is designed for people with incomes typically below $24,400 for married couples, and $12,200 for singles who could not be claimed as a dependent by someone else. This includes couples and individuals who are experiencing homelessness.

Anyone using the Non-Filers tool can speed the arrival of their payment by choosing to receive it by direct deposit. Those not choosing this option will get a check.

Beginning two weeks after they register, people can track the status of their payment using the Get My Payment tool, available only on IRS.gov.

Oct. 15 deadline nears for taxpayers who requested tax filing extensions

Oct. 15 deadline nears for taxpayers who requested tax filing extensions

The Internal Revenue Service today reminds taxpayers who filed an extension that the Oct. 15 due date to file their 2019 tax return is near.

Taxpayers should file their tax returns on or before the Oct. 15 deadline. For those who still owe, pay as soon as possible to reduce any penalties and interest.

Convenient electronic filing options, including IRS Free File, are still available. Taxpayers and tax professionals should continue to use electronic options to support social distancing and speed the processing of tax returns, refunds and payments.

Although Oct. 15 is the last day for most people to file, some taxpayers may have more time. They include:

Members of the military and others serving in a combat zone. They typically have 180 days after they leave the combat zone to file returns and pay any taxes due.
Taxpayers in federally declared disaster areas who already had valid extensions. For details, see the disaster relief page on IRS.gov.

Boosting Hispanic Small Business Owners During National Hispanic Heritage Month

Boosting Hispanic Small Business Owners During National Hispanic Heritage Month

 

BOOSTING HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURS DURING NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

National Hispanic Heritage Month runs from September 15 through October 15, and it’s the perfect time to celebrate the contributions of Hispanic small business owners to our nation’s economy and discuss how we can help them thrive and grow their businesses.

Hispanic-owned businesses generate significant economic benefit, spurring innovation and building wealth in diverse communities throughout America. Hispanic-owned small businesses are opening at a rate far above the national average, with the Hispanic share of all U.S. business owners growing 46% between 2007 and 2012. To encourage these positive trends, the small business community should offer more support, training and resources that enable Hispanic entrepreneurs to build and expand their businesses.

Fortunately, many small business assistance centers do already provide education focused on the Hispanic community, including many that offer resources in Spanish. Read on for a list of organizations that offer assistance specifically to Hispanic business owners:

  • The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) represents more than 4.37 million Hispanic-owned businesses through its network of 200 local chambers of commerce. USHCC and its local affiliates offer information and networking opportunities for Hispanic entrepreneurs. They also offer education on policy issues facing Hispanic small business owners, like access to capital, international trade, immigration, education and workforce development, and infrastructure.
  • The Minority Business Development Agency, part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, oversees a network of business centers that offer help in finding capital, securing government contracts and other aspects of expanding your small business.
  • The National Hispanic Business Group is one the nation’s largest networking organizations for Hispanic businesses of all sizes.
  • The National Minority Supplier Development Council works nationwide to help minority-business owners expand through a national network of minority suppliers.
  • Centro Community Partners is an organization that helps entrepreneurs launch their business ideas through a number of programs. Many of these programs, including their basic program to build a small business and their app for developing a business plan, are available in Spanish.
  • Code2040—named in recognition of the fact that the U.S. will be majority people of color in 2040—is a group working to support black and Latinx technology entrepreneurs with a goal of making tech more inclusive and representative.
  • SCORE Mentors is a national nonprofit organization that matches entrepreneurs with mentors who can help them navigate the process of starting a business, and you can filter by language to find Spanish-speaking mentors.
  • Your local Small Business Development Center (SBDC) or economic development agency likely offers resources in Spanish, especially if you live in a Hispanic-majority community. Find your local SBDC to see if they can provide support to your small business.
  • Many national small business organizations have dedicated Spanish-language resources:

This list is far from exhaustive, but it’s a good place to start looking for organizations that work to promote and inspire Hispanic entrepreneurs. As we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we should focus on how we can better support this community by helping current business owners grow their businesses and empowering aspiring entrepreneurs.

IRS Offers Disaster Relief to California Tax Payers

IRS Offers Disaster Relief to California Tax Payers

Victims of California wildfires getting IRS disaster relief.

California has been hit by a series of wildfires going back to Aug. 14. Taxpayers now have until Dec. 15, 2020 to file their various individual and business tax returns and make any tax payments.

The IRS says the relief is for taxpayers and businesses in any area designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as qualifying for individual assistance.

This currently includes Lake, Monterey, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma and Yolo counties in California. Taxpayers in other localities that are added to the disaster declaration later will automatically get the same relief.

The most current list of eligible counties and locations is available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov.

The IRS says these relief measures postpone various deadlines that occurred starting Aug. 14.

“As a result, affected individuals and businesses will have until December 15, 2020, to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period,” an IRS release states. “This means individuals who had a valid extension to file their 2019 return due to run out on Oct. 15, 2020, will now have until Dec. 15, 2020, to file.”

It should be noted, however, that because payments related to these 2019 returns were due by July 15, 2020, those payments are not included in the relief package.

The Dec. 15 deadline also applies to quarterly estimated income tax payments due Sept. 15 and the quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due Oct. 31. It also applies to tax-exempt organizations operating on a calendar-year basis that had a valid extension date to run out on Nov. 15.

Businesses with extensions also have the additional time, including, among others, calendar-year corporations whose 2019 extensions run out on Oct. 15.

IRS advice for those who missed the July 15 2020 deadline, file now to avoid bigger bill

IRS advice for those who missed the July 15 2020 deadline, file now to avoid bigger bill

For those who missed the July 15 tax deadline and didn’t request an extension, the Internal Revenue Service reminds taxpayers about some important tips, including filing electronically as soon as possible to reduce potential penalties.

Some taxpayers may have extra time to file and pay any taxes due without penalties and interest. These include:

The IRS offers these after-tax-day tips:

File to get a tax refund

The only way to get a refund is to file a tax return. There is no penalty for filing after the deadline if a refund is due. Use electronic filing options including IRS Free File available on IRS.gov through October 15 to prepare and file returns electronically.

The IRS reminds taxpayers that, while we continue to process electronic and paper tax returns, issue refunds, and accept payments, we’re experiencing delays in processing paper tax returns due to limited staffing. If a taxpayer filed a paper tax return, we will process it in the order we received it. Do not file a second tax return or call the IRS.

Taxpayers can track a refund using the Where’s My Refund? tool on IRS.gov, IRS2Go and by phone at 800-829-1954. Taxpayers need the primary Social Security number on the tax return, the filing status and the expected refund amount. The tool updates once daily, usually overnight, so checking more frequently will not yield different results. The “Where’s My Refund?” tool cannot be used to track Economic Impact Payments.

File to reduce penalties and interest

Normally, taxpayers should file their tax return, or request an extension, and pay any taxes they owe by the deadline to avoid penalties and interest. Taxpayers need to remember that an extension to file is not an extension to pay. Penalties and interest will apply to taxes owed after July 15.

Even if a taxpayer can’t afford to immediately pay the taxes they owe, they should still file a tax return as soon as possible to reduce possible penalties. The IRS has more information for taxpayers who owe the IRS, but cannot afford to pay.

Ordinarily, the failure-to-file penalty is 5% of the tax owed for each month or part of a month that a tax return is late. But if a return is filed more than 60 days after the due date, the minimum penalty is either $435 or 100% of the unpaid tax, whichever is less. Filing and paying as much as possible is important because the late-filing penalty and late-payment penalty add up quickly. The basic failure-to-pay penalty rate is generally 0.5% of unpaid tax owed for each month or part of a month. For more see IRS.gov/penalties.

Taxpayers who have a history of filing and paying on time often qualify for penalty relief. A taxpayer will usually qualify if they have filed and paid timely for the past three years and meet other requirements. For more information, see the first-time penalty abatement page on IRS.gov.

Pay taxes due electronically

Those who owe taxes can view their balance, pay with IRS Direct Pay, by debit or credit card or apply online for a payment plan, including an installment agreement. Several other electronic payment options are available on IRS.gov/payments. They are secure and easy to use. Taxpayers paying electronically receive immediate confirmation when they submit their payment. With Direct Pay and the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), taxpayers can opt in to receive email notifications about their payments.

Taxpayer Bill of Rights

Taxpayers have fundamental rights under the law that protect taxpayers when they interact with the IRS. The Taxpayer Bill of Rights presents these rights in 10 categories. IRS Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer, highlights these rights and the agency’s obligation to protect them.

IRS Warns Against Corona Virus Fraud, and Other Scams

IRS Warns Against Corona Virus Fraud, and Other Scams

The IRS is reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for corona virus fraud and other scams.

According to a release from the IRS, criminals continue to use the corona virus relief payments as a cover to steal personal information and money.

Below are some corona virus schemes the IRS is urging taxpayers to look out for:

  • Using relief payments as a cover to get personal information and money
  • Selling fake at-home test kits
  • Selling fake cures, vaccines, pills and advice
  • Selling large quantities of medical supplies through fake shops, websites, social media accounts and email addresses
  • Setting up fake charities
  • Offering opportunities to invest early in companies working on a vaccine for the disease
  • Phishing scams using emails, letters, texts and links

Scams should be reported to the National Center for Disaster Fraud hotline at 1-866-720-5721 or submitted through the
web complaint form here –> https://www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form